Kid Writing

© Copyright Mark Krokos 2010 -2016

Do you Remember how excited you were when your child began to talk? You probably celebrated every sound and attempt at speech. Well you can support your child’s written language development in much the same way!

 

In my classroom students will be utilizing Kid Writing. What is Kid Writing? In Kid Writing students first think about what they want to say, and then make letters for the sounds they hear in the words. After the children write I then rewrite the students’ words in “adult writing”.

 

In this way students use phonics-based spelling and then compare it to the conventional spellings of words. While students construct their own spellings for most words there are some words that will be formally taught and therefore expected to be spelled correctly. All formally taught words will appear on the classroom word wall and the students will be free to look at those words at anytime.

 

The use of Kid Writing also allows students to explore writing, risk free, and in a natural way. Writing in this way does not limit students to using only words and discussing topics they are comfortable with.

 

Listed below are the stages of writing your child will probably go through as the year progresses. One of the great things about Kid Writing is that no matter what level you child is currently at they will able to increase their skill level. My goal is for each of my students is to enjoy writing and begin little by little to understand how to become a good writer. With your help, together, we can celebrate your child’s attempts and gradual growth as a beginning writer!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Tip:

 

· Tell your child what and why  you write things: shopping lists, letters, reminder notes, etc.

 

· Praise all early writing attempts

 

http://kidwriting.homestead.com/files/book_cover_1111.jpg

Check out the Kid Writing website below for more information:

 

kidwriting.homestead.com/

Level 1: Emerging/Scribble

This is the beginning level at which your child scribbles. You may not be able to tell what the picture is about, but it’s important to praise your child’s beginning drawing.

 

 

Level 2: Pictorial

At this level, your child begins to draw a somewhat recognizable picture and may tell about it. He or she may also imitate writing.

Level 3: Precommunicative

Your child may now be printing his or her own name or an occasional known word and may be writing strings of letter like forms or a series of random letter. Sometimes he or she may attempt to read the message back, but you probably can’t read it.

Level 4: Pictorial

At this level, your child begins to draw a somewhat recognizable picture and may tell about it. He or she may also imitate writing.

Level 5: Phonetic

Now your child writes most words using beginning and ending consonant sounds and spells some frequently used words correctly. He or she may begin to add vowel sounds, but they are often not the correct ones. At this level, your child may begin to leave spaces between words. It’s getting easier to read your child’s writing.

Level 6: Transitional

At this level, your child is writing words the way they sound, representing most syllables in words. He or she may sometimes be adding an extra silent e at the end of a word or doubling letters when they’re not needed while trying visually to remember how spelling works. Now your child usually leaves spaces between words and is spelling many words correctly as he or she writes more than one sentence.

Level 7: Conventional

At this level, Your child spells most words correctly, although he or she may use phonics-based spelling for advanced words. Remember, we can only expect children to correctly spell words they have already learned. Now your child is usually using capital and lowercase letters and periods and question marks correctly.

Level 8: Advanced

Advanced writers uses a rich, varied body of written vocabulary. They may still use phonics-based spelling for advanced words but have mastered the spelling of commonly used words. At this level, your child uses quotation marks, commas, and apostrophes correctly and usually organizes writing into appropriate paragraphs.

Mountain Top

Fairview Elementary School

117 Spruce Street

Mountain Top, Pa 18707

 

Phone: 570-474-5942

E-mail: mark.krokos@csdcomets.org

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